Trexperience/Amaravathi

Trexperience/Amaravathi

Place: Farm house at Amaravathi, next to Udumalpet, Tiruppur.
Team: 20 members (inclusive of staff) from Eco Club, PSG CAS
Dates: Feb. 21 - 23, 2014.
Staff: Professors C.R.Jayaprakash &Nisha.

Participants’ list:

1.  A.Kalai Arasi

2. A.Satyamurthy

3. S. Sudharsun

4. S.K.Kovendra Raja

5. K.Karthik

6. T.Siddharth

7.A.Anju Krishna

8.R.Vandana Rajshree

9.Bharrani Pargavi (I BA English)

1o.Shobika Selvaraj ( I BA English)

11.M.Baskar

13. Mahesh Kumar

13. Kanaka Praba

14. V. Anusubha ( I BSc Botany)

15.Bhushna ( I BSc Maths)

16.Mohammed Ashiq.

Trek report by Kalai Arasi ( III BCom)

THE AMARAVATHY TREXPERIENCE

      The trip started at 5.30pm on Friday to Amaravathy reservoir which is located in Anamalai Tiger Reserve, Tirupur district, Tamil Nadu. Amaravathy dam is built across Amaravathy River which is a tributary of Kaveri. It’s notable for its high fisheries yield and south India’s largest wild breeding population of mugger crocodiles. The primary inflows of water here are from Chinnar, Pambar river which then carried over through Amaravathy River. On the way the dinner was arranged at the student’s farm house and after dinner we reached the farm house of another student where we stayed for two days.

      On the second day we started to trek Jamboo malai, a scrub forest around 8 am. Reached the top by 10 am and pictured the scenery, a sight of the village and returned by 11.15 am. We came back to farm house and had breakfast. Later we had our introductory conversation. About 1.15 pm we were taken to Amaravathy crocodile farm which was established in 1976. This largest crocodile nursery is 90 km from Tirupur via Palladam and Udumalpet. At the crocodile farm many crocodiles of all sizes were seen basking in the sun making stride or piled up on another. By 4.30 pm we started to Chinnar where we saw an elephant very closely. The elephant was little angry on the intruders and we happen to have a close glimpse of it. Two spotted deers were also found along the way. We came back to farm house around 7.30 and had our dinner and left to rest. That night students were allowed to stay in a garden house and the history of the place was told by Mr.Ramu, the cook. Students were allowed to experience the unique natural environment and living of the olden times. We had a great night under the roof of sky and moonlight.

      On third day around 6.30 am we were taken into the forest of Amaravathy which was nearly 7 km from Amaravathy to Thoovanam falls. About 2 hours walk along the riverside lead to the falls. Tufted grey langurs, a type of monkeys made alarm calls in the the forest; we also saw groups of wild boars. Crossing wild thorny plants we reached the falls and had a majestic long view of the falls. We also got sight of crocodiles in the river and returned at 11.45 am on the way we saw Sambar deer. After breakfast a feedback session was conducted and reviews were heard. Gifts were given to the people of the farm house. We started back to college by 4.15 pm and reached college at 7.30 pm.

 

List of birds:

1)    Red whiskered bulbul

2)    Black Drongo

3)    Indian pond heron

4)    Rose ringed parakeets

5)    Spotted dove

6)    Laughing dove

7)    White throated kingfisher

8)     Asian Paradise flycatcher

9)    House crow

10) Large billed crow

11) White browed wagtail

12) Red wattled lapwing

13) House sparrow

14) Eurasian tree sparrow

15) Plain flower pecker

16) Purple sunbird

17) Indian cormorants

18) Rosy starlings

19) Chest nut headed bee-eater

20) Malabar whistling thrush

Pipit

 

List of flora:

1)    Mango- mangifera indica

2)    Coconut-cocus nulifera

3)    Tamarind-tamarindus indicus

4)    Guava-psidium cujava

5)    Banana-musa paradisica

6)    Pomegranate-punica granatum

7)    Teak-tectora grandis

8)     Manoranjidam- artabotrys odorotissimus

9)    Whiskered spider flower-c leome gynandra

10) Country mallow- abutilon indicum

11) Common sida-sida acuta

12) Puncture plant- tribulus terrestris

13) Common balsam-impatiens balsamina

14) Greater rattle pod- crotalaria leschenaultii

15) Common floss flower-c hromolaena odorata

16) Candle cassia- cassia alata

17) Tanners cassia- Cassia ariculata

18) Bristle gourd- momordica dioica

19) Goat weed- ageratum conyzoides

20) Mexican floss flower-ageratum houstonianum

21) Purple bane-cyathocline purpurea

22) Country dandelion- launea procumbens

23) Malabar jasmine- jasminum malabaricum

24) Coat buttons- tridax procumbens

25) Giant milk weed-calotropis gigantea

26) Little glory- evolvulus alsinoides

27) Marsh glory- ipomeas aquatica

28) Purple trumpet

29) Arali-nerium indicum

30) Lesser glory- ipomoea obscura

31) Blue dawn glory- ipomoea nil

32) Thorn apple- datura metel

33) Common pedalium- pedalium murex

34) Common lantana- lantana camera

35) Pirandai- cissus quandragularis

36) Lion’s ear- leonotis nepetiifolia

37) Congress grass- parthenium hysterophorus

38) Lemon grass

39) Creeping hemp- crotalaria filipes

40) Firecracker flower- crossandra infundibuliformis

 

 

Pre event details:

Principal’s permission obtained on Feb. 17, 2013.

Selected students should pay Rs.1,000 to the Co-ordinator by Feb. 17, Monday,  2 pm, 2014. (Eco Club sponsors the travel cost).

Reporting time for the trip: 5.30 pm, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014.

Return by 8 pm, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014.

Travel, Food, Accommodation and Entry Fee charges only will be borne by Eco Club.

Students are to bring their own
1.Personal Medicines
2. Blanket
3. Torch light
4. One litre water bottle
5. Reusable food plate
6. Sneakers (with an extra pair of socks)
7.Basic hand book on Birds/Mammals and a
8. Back pack.

Special prizes for Best Image, Poster, Write - up and Video submissions will be awarded in the post trek meet at PSG CAS.

Expenditure

Expenses for the Amaravathi trek ( Feb. 21 - 23, 2014)

Income:
Money collected from the students - Rs.16,000 (Rs.1000 each).

Expense:

Groceries - Rs.7,000
Fish, Chicken and Egg - Rs.2,600
Bakery Items - Rs.500
Rentals for vessels - Rs.750
Cook - Rs.1100
College Canteen (Plan meet on Feb.20) - Rs. 200.
Trek Guide fees - Rs.300
Posters (Design & Print) - Rs.1,000 (Loganathan working on it)
Books as mementoes to Sabari’s family - Rs.750
Books as Prizes to students (3) - Rs.1,000 ( to be conducted this week).
Toll gate & Tips - 500
Post trip meet at Canteen - Rs.300 ( to be conducted this week).

Transportation cost of Rs.10,200 will be paid from Eco Club’s account.

Comments (11)

The Queen of Trees

THE QUEEN OF TREES

     Living beings can live without many things, but air and water. The oxygen we take in is given to us by the trees living around us and in return, we give them Carbon-di-oxide. This process constantly proves the importance of trees. While all the trees are like mothers, one tree stands tall above all others by sheltering and nurturing millions of living things, The Sycamore Fig, ‘THE QUEEN OF TREES’. This particular documentary directed by Mark Deblee, not only shows the dependency of living things on the fig tree but also reveal the tree’s dependency on even the smallest of creatures for both survival and the existence of her species.

       The documentary visualizes the tree’s fruit cycle and her contribution in keeping the ecosystem balanced. The tree at times becomes our guru and teaches the balance of life, but a more powerful lesson is sowed in every frame that, everything in nature is interdependent to one another and the loss of even one species could create a huge crater in the system.

       Despite the birds’ chirp, the ringing Cikada’s, the gashing of waters and the flutter of leaves, the love between the tree and the wasps cherishes. The tree shelters and feeds the wasps and in return the wasps help in pollination.  The two live an inseparable life, despite the guarding ants. Nothing can ever separate the two and when they are separated, we might witness a heart attack in the ecosystem. But to our good, the romantic tale will continue until the far horizons touch the ground.

Jabez John Anand ( I MJMC). 

 

THE QUEEN OF TREES documentary which was directed by Mark Deeble and Victoria stone covers the entire life of an African Fig tree from its very start to its next generation and its life during various seasons in the forest. The document also shows the special relationship of the fig tree with various tiny insects like fig wasp, bees and animals which are benefited by the various uses from the tree. The tree functions as a host for various birds to build their nest. This 52 minutes film was released on 22nd November 2005, UK. The interesting fact about the fig wasp is that the wasp is so small that it can fly even through the eye of a needle

- S.Kalai Arasi ( II BCom).

 

Screened at Sathyam Hall, PSG CAS as a part of Coimbatore Vizha - 2014 on Feb.5, 2014.

 

Comments (1)

A Second Hand Life

A SECOND HAND LIFE

     India, one of the fast developing countries in the world, one of the few countries with nuclear power, one of the world’s largest trade hubs and on and on and on. Yet, India still lives ‘A SECOND HAND LIFE’, not fully though. This documentary reveals the nasty face of this country of colours. It portrays the danger this country is facing because of its foreign allies.

       Many western and European countries dump their old electronic gadgets in India and Shockingly, a part of the country lives on this e-waste. This documentary reveals the involvement of children in this illegal business of breaking open old computers, air conditioners, televisions etc, and selling the small valuables items inside it. It also gives a contrast between the lives of a girl and a boy, in which the former uses a second hand computer for education purpose whereas, the latter works in a shop breaking old computers for valuable things like gold and copper inside it. A life is profited and a life is spoilt by a second hand computer but according to a data, the overall ratio of spoilage and profit is 10:1. The data also show threats of serious health issues because of the high level of toxicity emitted from the gadgets. If this mass dumping continues, India might soon become the world’s largest dump yard.

Jabez John Anand (II MJMC) 

  

A SECOND HAND LIFE as the name suggests the film investigates the murky side of the IT in which the hazardous e-waste are dumped into developing countries like India. The film was directed by Nutan manmohan and produced by Rajiv mehrotra in the year 2004. The term “A Second hand life” which was meant in the film is the life of the children who struggle for their survival inside the e-waste. Those persons who work with the e-wastes have more possibilities of getting affected by the chemicals, acids used in them and end their life soon in various dangerous disease like cancer and so on. On the other hand the film also shows the normal life of a school girl who was benefited by the second hand computers which are sent by foreign countries to her school’s computer lab.  Moreover from the film we can understand that any waste in the forest are converted into resources again by other organism as a biological cycle but the waste which are produced from our world can never be converted into resource again. This film also has received “DELHI CHIEF MINISTER’S SPECIAL AWARD”, Vatavaran in the year 2005 - S.Kalai Arasi ( II BCom).

Screened at Sathyam Hall, PSG CAS as a part of Coimbatore Vizha -2o14 on Feb.4, 2014.

Comments (1)

Angels in Tiger land

 ANGELS IN TIGER LAND

     Pansies, Bottles, Bird wings, Mormons, Swallow tails, Sword tails and Peacocks of all colours and size. No other name could have been softer and smoother to these fairies of our world but, Butterfly. It is a real treat to see them float across our eyes. ‘Angels in Tiger Land’ takes us on a fluttering travel with Mr. Suresh, as he tries to document the butterflies of the Periyar Tiger Reserve. His patience and hard work have really gifted the audience with a colorful treat to the windows of the world, eyes.

       To be able to sit near a caterpillar and film its lifecycle as it changes costumes of a cocoon and a brilliant butterfly after breaking out from its egg shell is a tedious job and one can see the success of this documentary in every flutter after a broken cocoon. This documentary further explains how important butterflies are to the ecosystem and the worth of their existence, thanks to Mr. Suresh Elamon.

       Life on earth could never be meaningful if, one does not have time to enjoy the flutter of a butterfly - Jabez John Anand ( I MJMC).

 

ANGELS IN TIGER LAND is of Indian origin which was directed by Suresh Elamon was screened. The film which lasted for 35 minutes took the viewers for an exciting excursion into the interesting and colourful world of Butterflies. This is the first ever video footage of extremely rare and legendary species of butterfly of Indian Sub-Continent “TRAVANCORE EVENING BROWN” (PARATIRROHEA MARSHALLI) and its life cycle. It also had the stunning visuals of the metamorphosis of largest butterfly in India, “SOUTHERN BIRD WING” (TROIDES MINOS). The film which was released on September 2004 won the “BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD” in Wildlife and environment in CMS Vatavaran Film festival, Delhi in the year 2007 - S. Kalai Arasi.

Screened at Sathyam hall, PSG CAS as a part of Coimbatore Vizha - 2014 Film Festival on Feb.4, 2014.

Comments

Cherub of the Mist

CHERUB OF THE MIST

       Himalayas, one of the most magnificent mountains in the world and a pride of India. They are the sanctuary to thousands of living beings and a haven for rich bio diversity. Creatures here have unique lifestyles to survive in this unforgiving paradise. Somewhere in these incredible hills lives one of nature’s serene beauties, The Red Panda. Being not filmed much, the life of these pandas have always been secret until, a team of young scientists take the challenge of following and filming the lives of two zoo-born female pandas, Mini and Sweetie, in one of the most toughest and coldest forests of eastern India.

       Tracking them with a GPS, Tensing, a local researcher loses hope and even seeks the divine help of local Gods, only to find Mini killed by a predator. But, nature has some joy in store for the team as they find Sweetie mated and given birth to two cubs. The team even films the mating of two wild Red Pandas for the first time in history. Mission accomplished. Yet, a lot is to be done by the team to ensure the safety and existence of these beautiful Cherubs of The Misty Himalayas.

       This brilliant documentary directed by Naresh Bedi, could very much help in the research on the Red Pandas in the near future, since, this is the first visual data.

Jabez John Anand ( I MJMC).

“CHERUB OF THE MIST” - directed   by Naresh Bedi and produced by Rajesh Bedi. The 50 min film was released in 2006 and delineates the affection between two beautiful Red Pandas Mini and sweety. They were released into Singalila National Park, Darjeeling District, India. The film conclusively shows the courtship, mating, nest building, rearing of cubs of these little creatures. Documentary was taken for about 14 month’s period. It has also won“REVELATION AWARD” at Vatavaran wild life documentary film festival in the year 2007.

S.Kalai Arasi (II BCom).

Screened at Sathyam Hall, PSG CAS as a part of Coimbatore Vizha 2014 Environmental Film Festival on Feb.3, 2014.

Comments (1)

Coimbatore Vizha 2014 Environment Film Festival

Eco Club conducted an Environmental Film Festival at PSG CAS from Feb.3, 2014 to Feb.6, 2014 at Sathyam Hall. The event was conducted as a part of Coimbatore Vizha - 2014 announced by Young Indians (YI) of Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) in association with Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History (SACON) and Salim Ali Naturalists’ Forum (SANF)

Films were screened from 4 pm to 6pm on all these four days. Staff Coordinators C.R.Jayaprakash, Anitha and Nisha, SACON Scientist DR. P.Pramod, SANF Secretary Xavier were present during the shows. Here is a detailed report from S.Kalaiarasi (III BCom) 

 

The films which were screened for the event of “KOVAI VIZHA” were giving ravishing experience about the ecological life. The First film screened was “CHERUB OF THE MIST” directed   by Naresh Bedi and produced by Rajesh Bedi. The 50 min film was released in 2006 and delineates the affection between two beautiful Red Pandas Mini and sweety. They were released into Singalila National Park, Darjeeling District, India. The film conclusively shows the courtship, mating, nest building, rearing of cubs of these little creatures. Documentary was taken for about 14 month’s period. It has also won “REVELATION AWARD” at Vatavaran wild life documentary film festival in the year 2007.

         On the 2nd day, the documentary “ANGELS IN TIGER LAND” is of Indian origin which was directed by Suresh Elamon was screened. The film which lasted for 35 minutes took the viewers for an exciting excursion into the interesting and colourful world of Butterflies. This is the first ever video footage of extremely rare and legendary species of butterfly of Indian Sub-Continent “TRAVANCORE EVENING BROWN” (PARATIRROHEA MARSHALLI) and its life cycle. It also had the stunning visuals of the metamorphosis of largest butterfly in India, “SOUTHERN BIRD WING” (TROIDES MINOS). The film which was released on September 2004 won the “BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY AWARD” in Wildlife and environment in CMS Vatavaran Film festival, Delhi in the year 2007.

 The next film screened was “A SECOND HAND LIFE” as the name suggests the film investigates the murky side of the IT in which the hazardous e-waste are dumped into developing countries like India. The film was directed by Nutan manmohan and produced by Rajiv mehrotra in the year 2004. The term “A Second hand life” which was meant in the film is the life of the children who struggle for their survival inside the e-waste. Those persons who work with the e-wastes have more possibilities of getting affected by the chemicals, acids used in them and end their life soon in various dangerous disease like cancer and so on. On the other hand the film also shows the normal life of a school girl who was benefited by the second hand computers which are sent by foreign countries to her school’s computer lab.  Moreover from the film we can understand that any waste in the forest are converted into resources again by other organism as a biological cycle but the waste which are produced from our world can never be converted into resource again. This film also has received “DELHI CHIEF MINISTER’S SPECIAL AWARD”, Vatavaran in the year 2005.

On the 3rd day “THE QUEEN OF TREES” documentary which was directed by Mark Deeble and Victoria stone was screened. This film covers the entire life of an African Fig tree from its very start to its next generation and its life during various seasons in the forest. The document also shows the special relationship of the fig tree with various tiny insects like fig wasp, bees and animals which are benefited by the various uses from the tree. The tree functions as a host for various birds to build their nest. This 52 minutes film was released on 22nd November 2005, UK. The interesting fact about the fig wasp is that the wasp is so small that it can fly even through the eye of a needle.

 

Comments (1)

Moody Landscapes

A Photo Exhibition at Contemplate Art Gallery by K.Jayaram.

Pre Event Coverage in THE HINDU

K. Jayaram’s ‘Moody Landscapes’ shows how he treats photography like art, writes     K. Jeshi
Internationally renowned photographer Jayaram displays prints of his landscape photographs, shot over many years across India, for the first time in Coimbatore. Titled ‘Moody Landscapes’, the exhibition at Contemplate, has over 50 landscape photographs he has shot in locations such as Kabini, the Nilgiris, Silent Valley, Bharatpur Sanctuary and the Chambal Valley.

The prints are on archival museum matte paper imported from Germany. This conforms to international standards and adds artistic value to the photographs, explains Jayaram. Better known as a macro photographer, Jayaram says there are so many other things in Nature to observe besides birds, butterflies and animals. “Every single day is a different one.”

Kabini at dawn

His series on Kabini captures the many moods of a misty landscape at dawn. Pointing to a lonely boat in the mist he says: “It was a winter morning and we were on a boat ride for morning safari. We were lost and we parked the boat in the middle of the lake. Suddenly, the mist cleared for a fraction of a second and I got the shot. The wavy moment of water created by our boat gave the photograph a greater impact.”

It is important for a photographer to pre-visualise an image and approach it as an art form, he says. He does this in ‘Sunrise In A Sanctuary’, where he highlights the play of light and shade.

Jayaram’s biggest regret is the rapidly changing landscapes. He shows a photograph that he had shot many years ago on the Bangalore-Mysore Highway. The photograph is of trees in silhouette against a red evening sky. “The trees were over 1,000 years old. But they are no more.”

Often, the photographer has to have that eye to see things differently. For example, there is a black-and-white photograph of wild flowers, shot near Madurai. “There were hardly any colours, so I converted the image to black and white. You can’t click images at your convenience and later photoshop them,” he states.

Monsoon at Silent Valley

Like most of his other photographs, one of the Silent Valley also has a story. “It rained for six days continuously. One day, I woke up with an intuition about the possibility of a good photograph. Sure enough, a beautiful landscape opened up to me for a few seconds,” he remembers.

‘Tree Line’ shows the magnificence of the Blue Mountains. “We were in search of birds and butterflies somewhere near Coonor and Kotagiri and what struck my eye is this image,” he recalls. There is another tree-photo taken at Parambikulam late in the evening. It shows the height of the mountains and the tree silhouettes add depth to the landscape.

He describes the experience of shooting in the cold at Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary. “In winters, the temperature is one degree till noon. You have to go prepared with gloves, shoes and winter wear. Even my camera wears a woollen blanket,” he smiles.

Other photographs that catch the eye are of artistically arrange haystacks, shot near Chambal. An orange sun in the Chambal valley, a peacock at sunrise in Rajasthan…every frame represents an experience that Jayaram remembers clearly. “The angle of sunlight and the thickness of mist lend a different feel to the photograph,” he explains.

There are ‘afterglow’ photographs too, of dramatic monsoon skies at sunset. Jayaram has also photographed the parhelion phenomenon. “This often happens in the Arctic Circle. I was lucky enough to spot it at Anaikatty. There are hexagonal ice crystals up there and, during sunset, the light which falls on the crystals bounces back on the clouds showcasing the Vibgyor palette.”

Jayaram also thinks like an artist. Pointing to some of his low-key light photographs, he says: “William Turner follows this style for his landscape paintings.” Photographs of a lonely pump house at Kollegal is reminiscent of the good old days, and the Hampi ruins are poignant. “We have so many beautiful places in our own backyard, we only need to look for them.”

The exhibition preview at Contemplate (above Ford Showroom, Avanashi Road) is on December 04 at 6 p.m. The display is open to the public from December 5 to 31 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on all days (including Sundays). For details, call: 0422-4226357.

Keywords: K. Jayaram, Moody Landscapes, landscape photographs, Coimbatore photography exhibition

Comments (2)

Bird Race at Coimbatore

Circular from SACON

Third Coimbatore Bird Race on 15th  December 2013

With the support of HSBC and Yuhina Eco-Media, Mumbai, Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology & Natural History and Salim Ali Naturalist Forum is organizing the third edition of Bird Race in Coimbatore on 15 December 2012.   The India Bird Race is a dawn-to-dusk event where a large gathering of experienced and budding birdwatchers spend an entire day spotting and identifying birds in an effort to record as many species of birds as possible.

It is my pleasure to invite all our bird watcher friends of Coimbatore to take part in this event. Those who are interested to take part in the Bird Race may have to form a team with an experienced bird watcher as the team leader. Maximum number of members permitted in a team is four. Please register your team on or before 9th December 2013. Registration forms attached with this mail should be filled in advance and submitted to the coordinator on or before 9th December. There will be a briefing session at ExNora International, 2/166, Kalidas Road, Ramnagar, Coimbatore 641009 (Opp to ICICI Bank) at 5.00 p.m on 13th December 2013 . Preferably the leader or atleast one member of each team has to attend the briefing session. Just sending application does not guarantee the participation in the programme.. Details of all the teams and their routes, detailed rules of the race will be available in the Nature Education Website of SACON (www.saconeducation.org ) 13th December onwards for every body’s knowledge. On 15th, the race should start at 6.00 am, later on the day there will be a get together for an interactive experience sharing session at 7.00 p.m. followed by dinner in Hotel City Tower, Gandhipuram, Coimbatore

Please note the following:

·         The race should start at 6.00 am can go up to 5.00 p.m. All teams have to submit the filled data sheet to the jury committee by 5.30 p.m. at Hotel City tower.

 ·         There will be a get together, meeting followed by dinner in the Hotel (7.00- 8.30 pm)

·         Participants of the Bird race and special invitees are only allowed to participate in the get together

·       The application without the valid email ID and cell phone number will not be considered. 

·         Confirmation of the participation along with the data formats will be given on 13th in the briefing session

·         The locations which are not mentioned in the application form will not be considered.

·         All members of one team should go together. Splitting of team is not allowed.

With warm regards

Dr. P.Pramod, Senior.Scientist and Coordinator of Bird Race, Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History, Anaikatty.P.O, Coimbatore India 641108

Phone 91 422 2203115,  94431677

Comments (1)

Types of Shots

Types of Shot



EWS (Extreme Wide Shot)

The view is so far from the subject that he isn’t even visible. Often used as an establishing shot.

VWS (Very Wide Shot)
The subject is visible (barely), but the emphasis is still on placing him in his environment.

WS (Wide Shot
The subject takes up the full frame, or at least as much as comfortably possible.

MS (Mid Shot)
Shows some part of the subject in more detail while still giving an impression of the whole subject.

MCU (Medium Close Up)
Half way between a MS and a CU.

CU (Close Up)
A certain feature or part of the subject takes up the whole frame.

ECU (Extreme Close Up)
The ECU gets right in and shows extreme detail.
Variation: Choker

Cut-In
Shows some (other) part of the subject in detail.

CA (Cutaway)
A shot of something other than the subject.

Two-Shot
A shot of two people, framed similarly to a mid shot.

(OSS) Over-the-Shoulder Shot
Looking from behind a person at the subject.

Noddy Shot
Usually refers to a shot of the interviewer listening and reacting to the subject.

Point-of-View Shot (POV)
Shows a view from the subject’s perspective

Weather Shot
The subject is the weather. Can be used for other purposes, e.g. background for graphics.

Ref: http://www.mediacollege.com/video/shots/point-of-view.html

Vivek Giri, II MJMC, Oct, 2013

Comments

Lighting

Light as subject
Where to position the lights in a new home or renovation is often a worry as once the wiring is in pace it is expensive to make changes.
The following guidelines are based on practical rules of thumb and may be helpful in planning how to place your lights.
For general lighting in the home downlights with the equivalent of a 100watt incandescent are a good choice.    New downlights have been designed for compact fluorescent lamps which can save up to 80% of the power required for a conventional incandescent bulb.  If fluorescent lamps are not suitable for any reason  there are halogen lamps available as replacements for conventional bulbs which save 30% of the power and are dimmable.
For estimatimg the number required allow one downlight for every 4 square metres (40 square feet).
The spacing of these downlights should be about three quarters of the height of the ceiling, e.g. if the stud height is 2.4 meters then space the lights at 1.8 meters.
An attractive alternative although more expensive is to use a combination of single and multiple low voltage downlights .

These distances are conservative and take no account of the light fittings design.  The data sheets of most lights give an SHR figure.  This is the maximum space to height ratio for the spacing of that light.  To find the spacing multiply the SHR by the height of the light.  eg 2.4 meter stud, SHR 1.25 the spacing would be 2.4 x 1,25 = 3.0 meters.

Halogen lights are  used for lighting working areas such as kitchen, laundry’s and bathrooms because of the quality of light they produce.  An advantage of halogen downlights is the variety of bulbs available.
Halogen lamps are available in 20watt , 35 watt and 50 watt and special fittings take 100 watts, but the advantage is that each is available in beam angles of 10, 24, 36 and 60 degrees.  This means that you can change the bulb to get a narrow beam or to spread the light.

The spacing of 50 watt halogen lights should be about half of the distance from the bench to the ceiling.  e.g. if this distance is 1.4 meters then the lights should be spaced about 0.7 meters apart, or half the distance from the floor to ceiling for general lighting.

Highlighting a wall can make a room appear larger, or used in an entry can make the hall seem inviting.
Halogen 50 watt lights are usually used and these are spaced about one quarter of the height of the wall out from the wall.  The lights are spaced about the same distance apart along the wall, and tilted to shine about one quarter of the way down the wall.

If a wall has an interesting texture, then grazing it with light is a popular option.  In this case 50 watt halogen lights are fitted about 300mm out from the wall and spaced about 450mm apart along the wall.

Highlighting a painting is usually done with a halogen 50 or 35 watt light.  If the light is recessed into the ceiling place it in line with the centre of the painting.   The distance out from the painting should be about two thirds of the distance from the centre of the painting to the ceiling.   Make sure that the halogen bulb has a UV filter or the light will bleach your painting.

General Lighting concepts
Foot candels
A foot-candle (sometimes foot candle; abbreviated fc, lm/ft2, or sometimes ft-c) is a non-SI unit of illuminance or light intensity widely used in the United States in photography, film, television, conservation lighting, the lighting industry, construction-related engineering and in building codes. The name “footcandle” conveys “the illuminance cast on a surface by a one-candela source one foot away”. As natural as this sounds, this style of name is now frowned upon, because dimensionally illuminance is not length times luminous intensity but luminous flux per unit area.

Ambient Light
In photography and cinematography, available light or ambient light refers to any source of light that is not explicitly supplied by the photographer for the purpose of taking photos. The term usually refers to sources of light that are alreadyavailable naturally (e.g. the sun, moon, lightning) or artificial light already being used (e.g. to light a room). It generally excludes flashes, although arguably flash lighting provided by other photographers shooting simultaneously in the same space could be considered available light. Light sources that affect the scene and are included in the actual frame are called practical light sources, or simply practicals.
Use of available light is an important factor in candid photography in order not to disturb the subjects.
The use of available light may pose a challenge for a photographer. The brightness and direction of the light is often not adjustable, except perhaps for indoor lighting. This will limit the selection of shutter speeds, and may require the use of shades or reflectors to manipulate the light. It can also influence the time, location, and even orientation of the photo shoot to obtain the desired lighting conditions. Available light can often also produce a color cast with color photography.

Levels of ambient light are most frequently considered relative to additional lighting used as fill light, in which case the ambient light is normally treated as the key light. In some cases, ambient light may be used as a fill, in which case additional lighting provides the stronger light source, for example in bounce flash photography. The relative intensity of ambient light and fill light is known as the lighting ratio, an important factor in calculating contrast in the finished image

Kelvin
The kelvin is often used in the measure of the colour temperature of light sources. Colour temperature is based upon the principle that a black body radiator emits light of which the colour depends on the temperature of the radiator. Black bodies with temperatures below about 4000 K appear reddish whereas those above about 7500 K appear bluish. Colour temperature is important in the fields of image projection and photography where a colour temperature of approximately 5600 K is required to match “daylight” film emulsions. In astronomy, the stellar classification of stars and their place on the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram are based, in part, upon their surface temperature, known as effective temperature. The photosphere of the Sun, for instance, has an effective temperature of 5778 K.

S.Anandhi, II MJMC, Oct. 2013

Comments

« Previous entries