Archive for Photography

Moody Landscapes

A Photo Exhibition at Contemplate Art Gallery by K.Jayaram.

Pre Event Coverage in THE HINDU

K. Jayaram’s ‘Moody Landscapes’ shows how he treats photography like art, writes     K. Jeshi
Internationally renowned photographer Jayaram displays prints of his landscape photographs, shot over many years across India, for the first time in Coimbatore. Titled ‘Moody Landscapes’, the exhibition at Contemplate, has over 50 landscape photographs he has shot in locations such as Kabini, the Nilgiris, Silent Valley, Bharatpur Sanctuary and the Chambal Valley.

The prints are on archival museum matte paper imported from Germany. This conforms to international standards and adds artistic value to the photographs, explains Jayaram. Better known as a macro photographer, Jayaram says there are so many other things in Nature to observe besides birds, butterflies and animals. “Every single day is a different one.”

Kabini at dawn

His series on Kabini captures the many moods of a misty landscape at dawn. Pointing to a lonely boat in the mist he says: “It was a winter morning and we were on a boat ride for morning safari. We were lost and we parked the boat in the middle of the lake. Suddenly, the mist cleared for a fraction of a second and I got the shot. The wavy moment of water created by our boat gave the photograph a greater impact.”

It is important for a photographer to pre-visualise an image and approach it as an art form, he says. He does this in ‘Sunrise In A Sanctuary’, where he highlights the play of light and shade.

Jayaram’s biggest regret is the rapidly changing landscapes. He shows a photograph that he had shot many years ago on the Bangalore-Mysore Highway. The photograph is of trees in silhouette against a red evening sky. “The trees were over 1,000 years old. But they are no more.”

Often, the photographer has to have that eye to see things differently. For example, there is a black-and-white photograph of wild flowers, shot near Madurai. “There were hardly any colours, so I converted the image to black and white. You can’t click images at your convenience and later photoshop them,” he states.

Monsoon at Silent Valley

Like most of his other photographs, one of the Silent Valley also has a story. “It rained for six days continuously. One day, I woke up with an intuition about the possibility of a good photograph. Sure enough, a beautiful landscape opened up to me for a few seconds,” he remembers.

‘Tree Line’ shows the magnificence of the Blue Mountains. “We were in search of birds and butterflies somewhere near Coonor and Kotagiri and what struck my eye is this image,” he recalls. There is another tree-photo taken at Parambikulam late in the evening. It shows the height of the mountains and the tree silhouettes add depth to the landscape.

He describes the experience of shooting in the cold at Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary. “In winters, the temperature is one degree till noon. You have to go prepared with gloves, shoes and winter wear. Even my camera wears a woollen blanket,” he smiles.

Other photographs that catch the eye are of artistically arrange haystacks, shot near Chambal. An orange sun in the Chambal valley, a peacock at sunrise in Rajasthan…every frame represents an experience that Jayaram remembers clearly. “The angle of sunlight and the thickness of mist lend a different feel to the photograph,” he explains.

There are ‘afterglow’ photographs too, of dramatic monsoon skies at sunset. Jayaram has also photographed the parhelion phenomenon. “This often happens in the Arctic Circle. I was lucky enough to spot it at Anaikatty. There are hexagonal ice crystals up there and, during sunset, the light which falls on the crystals bounces back on the clouds showcasing the Vibgyor palette.”

Jayaram also thinks like an artist. Pointing to some of his low-key light photographs, he says: “William Turner follows this style for his landscape paintings.” Photographs of a lonely pump house at Kollegal is reminiscent of the good old days, and the Hampi ruins are poignant. “We have so many beautiful places in our own backyard, we only need to look for them.”

The exhibition preview at Contemplate (above Ford Showroom, Avanashi Road) is on December 04 at 6 p.m. The display is open to the public from December 5 to 31 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on all days (including Sundays). For details, call: 0422-4226357.

Keywords: K. Jayaram, Moody Landscapes, landscape photographs, Coimbatore photography exhibition

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The Photography Club of Coimbatore

Coimbatore, August 19, 2013
The first photography exhibition and competition organized by The Photography Club of Coimbatore (TPCC) which received a good response from students, nature enthusiasts and photography.
The exhibition which was conducted as a part of the world photography day celebration got priorly inducted by Mr. Rajiv K Srivastava, the Field director of Anamalai Tiger Reserve and Mr. Surya Ramprakash, wildlife photographer, on Saturday morning at Srivari Brindhavan Gardens. Photographs depicting rural life, urban life, wildlife, nature and society, captured from all around the globe were displayed in the exhibition.

The prize winning photographs of the photography competition were also displayed. The prizes were given based on three groups, College level, Senior school level (10th-12th std) and Junior school level (9th std and below). K Madhan Kumar of KCT won the college level category and Sanjith Gurubaran of CIRS and Ayisha Ahamed of GRD school won the senior school level and the junior school level categories respectively. Many entries were received by the club from all over the city and the winners were adjudged based on the creativity applied in the pictures. “School students are more creative than college students, judging by the entries that we have received over the days” said Vignesh Balaji, a member of the adjudicators.
The pictures that were exhibited were also on sale and the money received is to be spent on conservation. Inspite of being a good display of talents, it would have been a better one, given captions and species names to the required images.

A Jabez John Anand, MJMC, PSG CAS.

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Types of Cameras

Types of Cameras

Single Use Cameras

:

Single Use Cameras are the simplest cameras. They contain a roll of color film encased in a recyclable cardboard box. They have a single shutter speed and a fixed-focus lens. These cameras can be bought with a variety of features, including built-in flash and water resistance. The whole camera has to be taken to the photo finisher so the film can be processed. The camera is recycled. These cameras cost around $15 and should not be used for serious photography. They are convenient for vacations and times when you find that the other camera has been forgotten.

Compact Lens-Shutter Cameras:

Compact Lens-Shutter Cameras come in three varieties: single focal length, dual focal length, and zoom. Some have fixed focus, meaning that the focus is fixed at a point that produces sharp images starting from about 5 ft. away and continuing to infinity. Other cameras offer infrared auto focusing. Some models offer features like red-eye reduction flash and several automatic shooting modes. More serious photographers usually prefer to have more control over the pictures they take.

Bridge Cameras 
:

Bridge cameras are intermediate cameras. They bridge the gap between “point and shoot” cameras and the more serious or complicated models. They have different lenses and many offer a red-eye reducing flash. There is only a limited range of lens focal length that can be used with these cameras.
Rangefinders 

Rangefinders are compact, lightweight cameras that are often used for serious photography. They offer interchangeable lenses and allow photographers to control shutter speed, lens aperture, focusing, and exposure. Some disadvantages are that it is limited in focal length (ranging from 21mm-135mm) and they tend to be expensive.

Twin Lens Reflex 

The twin lens reflex is a medium-format camera (one that uses film larger that 35mm). It is fitted with two lenses which both have the same focal length, one mounted atop the other. The lower (taking) lens focuses its image directly on the film, while the image produced by the upper viewing lens is reflected through 90 degrees by a mirror, and brought to focus on a horizontal ground-glass focusing screen. The light paths to the focusing screen and the film plane are equal, so that if the photographer brings the scene on the focusing screen to sharp focus, the image on the film plane will be equally sharp.

Single Lens Reflex 

The SLR requires one lens for both viewing and creating the photo. A sophisticated camera that offers full manual control of exposure an focus. SLR cameras will accept interchangeable lenses, add on flashes, motor drives, and other accessories. There are also AF (auto focus) SLR’s. These can be set in a number of different modes to ease picture taking. These cameras are typically used by professional photographers.
The word photography is derived from the greek words for light and writing. Sir John Herschel, was the first to use the term “Photography”. This was in 1839, the year the photographic process became public. There are two distinct scientific processes that combine to make photography possible. These processes had been known for quite some time, so it is somewhat surprising that photography was not invented earlier than the 1830s. It was not until the two distinct scientific processes had been put together that photography came into being.

The first of these processes was optical. The Camera Obscura (dark room) had been in existence for at least four hundred years. The second process was chemical. For hundreds of years before photography was invented, people had been aware, for example, that some colors are bleached in the sun, but they had made little distinction between how heat, air, and light created reactions.

In the sixteen hundreds Robert Boyle, a founder of the Royal Society, had reported that silver chloride turned dark under exposure. He believe that it was caused by exposure to the air, rather than to light.

Angelo Sala, in the early seventeenth century, noticed that the sun blackened powdered nitrate of silver. In 1727 Johann Heinrich Schulze discovered that when exposed to light, certain liquids change color. At the beginning of the nineteenth century Thomas Wedgwood was conducting experiments with pictures. He had successfully captured images, but his silhouettes wouldn’t stay, as there was no known method of making the image permanent.

Niépce successfully produced a picture in July of 1827. He used a material that hardened on exposure to light. The down side is that the picture required an 8 hour exposure. Niépce agreed to go into partnership with Lousi Daguerre on January 4, 1829. Although Niépce died 4 years later, Daguerre continued to experiment. Daguerre discovered a way of developing photographic plates. This process would greatly reduce the amount of exposure time. Instead of 8 hours it would only take half an hour. Daguerre also discovered that by dipping it in salt the image could be made permanent. The Daguerreotype was bought by the French Government and made public on Aug. 19, 1839.

William Henry Talbot had an invention called the Calotype. The Calotype produced a negative picture on paper. That means the lights were recorded as darks, and the darks as lights. The positive was made on another sheet of chemically sensitized paper, exposed to light through the negative. An infinite number of positives could be made from a single negative so Talbot’s invention and refinements of it predominated.

Photographers were like artists because they recorded contemporary events only with greater flexibility and on a much greater scale. One of the first photographic documents of history-in-the-making was also the greatest. This was the American Civil War. These were made by 20 photographers. Most of them were initially under the direction of Mathew B. Brady. They could not yet capture the action of battle with their big equipment, but their blunt views of landscapes, littered with the dead changed the popular vision of war.

Submitted by Naneetha.R, II MA Communication, October 2011.

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Types of Lens Filters

Types of Filters

Protective Filters

UV Filters - Absorbs ultraviolet rays.  Gives cleaner, sharper pictures with less haze.  Also serves as a permanent lens protector.
Sky Filters - Reduces blush tones in outdoor shots.  Keeps skin tones natural and free of reflection from nearby objects.  Also serves as a permanent lens protector.
Clear Protector Filters - Protect your valuable lenses from expensive front element damage which can be caused by dirt, scratches, and cross threading.
Polarizing Filters
Circular Polarizer and Moose Filters - Essential for outdoor photography; deepens intensity of blue skies; reduces or eliminates glare.  Circular Polarizing filters are used on auto focus cameras.
Linear Polarizer Filters and Linear Focus - Used on non-auto focus cameras.
Neutral Density Filters
Neutral Density Filters - Reduces the amount of light without affecting the color.  Eliminates overly bright, washed out images. Great for video.
Filter Kits
Filter Kits - Popular filter kits to save you money.

Ultra Thin Filters
HOYA HMC Ultra Thin Filters - High end filters designed to avoid vignetting problems which occur with wide angle lenses.
Special Effects Filters
Cross Screen, Soft Screen, Star 4, Star 6, and Star 8 - Creates a star in the picture where this is bright light.  Ideal for photographs of ladies wearing jewelry or other objects with strong reflections.
Close-up - For close-up photography.
Split Field Filters - One-half of the picture receives a close-up effect while the other half is normal.
Special Effect, MultiVision, and Mirage Filters - For special effect photography.
Pop Filter Sets - Original color effects and great for multi-exposure creativity.
Rainbow Spot Filters - Diffract each tiny point of light into a rainbow of color.
Dual Image Filters - Double exposures taking.
Sepia Filters - Give a nostalgic effect to otherwise ordinary color or black & white photographs.
Zoom Spot and Misty Spot Filters: Breeze, Halo, Windmill, and Gradual Filters - They have a sharp central image with a pleasant blurring of the outer field.  For special effect photography.
Center Spot, Soft Spot, and Color Spot Filters - The center has a clear spot, while the outside can be used as a portrait filter or color.
Softener Filters - Gives a soft gradation image, with focal point somewhat retained.
Infrared (IR) Pass Filters - For infrared photography.
Intensifier Filters - Intensifies and enhances colors.
Portrait, Duto, Diffusion, Spot Diffuser Filters - Diffusion filters give an overall soft focus effect. Can be used to create the romantic and mysterious effects.
Fog A & B Filters - Fog filters give an overall soft focus effect.  Fog filters can be used as a portrait filter or to create the romantic and mysterious effect of fog in any scene.
Colored Filters
Colored, Vario PL, Fantasy, and Tri Color Filters - Tone correction; improves contrast. Ideal for landscapes.
Half Colored and Gradual Color Filters - Half of the filter colored and half clear.
FL-W, FL-B, FL-D and Special Fluorescent Filters - Used to correct the greenish tone that appears when fluorescent lighting is present.
Warming & Cooling Filters
80A, 80B, and 80C Filters - These filters are for color photography in artificial light.
81A, 81B, and 81C Filters - Filters used to create a warming effect (reduces blues, increases reds).
82A, 82B, and 82C Filters - Filters used to create a cooling effect (reduces reds, increases blues).
85A, 85B, and 85C Filters - Filters used to create a warming effect (reduces blues, increases reds). These are more powerful than the 81 series.Submitted by Naneetha.R, II MA Communication, October 2011.

Types of Filters

Protective Filters

UV Filters - Absorbs ultraviolet rays.  Gives cleaner, sharper pictures with less haze.  Also serves as a permanent lens protector.
Sky Filters - Reduces blush tones in outdoor shots.  Keeps skin tones natural and free of reflection from nearby objects.  Also serves as a permanent lens protector.
Clear Protector Filters - Protect your valuable lenses from expensive front element damage which can be caused by dirt, scratches, and cross threading.
Polarizing Filters
Circular Polarizer and Moose Filters - Essential for outdoor photography; deepens intensity of blue skies; reduces or eliminates glare.  Circular Polarizing filters are used on auto focus cameras.
Linear Polarizer Filters and Linear Focus - Used on non-auto focus cameras.
Neutral Density Filters
Neutral Density Filters - Reduces the amount of light without affecting the color.  Eliminates overly bright, washed out images. Great for video.
Filter Kits
Filter Kits - Popular filter kits to save you money.

Ultra Thin Filters
HOYA HMC Ultra Thin Filters - High end filters designed to avoid vignetting problems which occur with wide angle lenses.
Special Effects Filters
Cross Screen, Soft Screen, Star 4, Star 6, and Star 8 - Creates a star in the picture where this is bright light.  Ideal for photographs of ladies wearing jewelry or other objects with strong reflections.
Close-up - For close-up photography.
Split Field Filters - One-half of the picture receives a close-up effect while the other half is normal.
Special Effect, MultiVision, and Mirage Filters - For special effect photography.
Pop Filter Sets - Original color effects and great for multi-exposure creativity.
Rainbow Spot Filters - Diffract each tiny point of light into a rainbow of color.
Dual Image Filters - Double exposures taking.
Sepia Filters - Give a nostalgic effect to otherwise ordinary color or black & white photographs.
Zoom Spot and Misty Spot Filters: Breeze, Halo, Windmill, and Gradual Filters - They have a sharp central image with a pleasant blurring of the outer field.  For special effect photography.
Center Spot, Soft Spot, and Color Spot Filters - The center has a clear spot, while the outside can be used as a portrait filter or color.
Softener Filters - Gives a soft gradation image, with focal point somewhat retained.
Infrared (IR) Pass Filters - For infrared photography.
Intensifier Filters - Intensifies and enhances colors.
Portrait, Duto, Diffusion, Spot Diffuser Filters - Diffusion filters give an overall soft focus effect. Can be used to create the romantic and mysterious effects.
Fog A & B Filters - Fog filters give an overall soft focus effect.  Fog filters can be used as a portrait filter or to create the romantic and mysterious effect of fog in any scene.
Colored Filters
Colored, Vario PL, Fantasy, and Tri Color Filters - Tone correction; improves contrast. Ideal for landscapes.
Half Colored and Gradual Color Filters - Half of the filter colored and half clear.
FL-W, FL-B, FL-D and Special Fluorescent Filters - Used to correct the greenish tone that appears when fluorescent lighting is present.
Warming & Cooling Filters
80A, 80B, and 80C Filters - These filters are for color photography in artificial light.
81A, 81B, and 81C Filters - Filters used to create a warming effect (reduces blues, increases reds).
82A, 82B, and 82C Filters - Filters used to create a cooling effect (reduces reds, increases blues).
85A, 85B, and 85C Filters - Filters used to create a warming effect (reduces blues, increases reds). These are more powerful than the 81 series.

Comments (1)

Types of Lenses

Types of lens

 

The independence to change lenses based on your needs gives a lot of freedom to a photographer. But what are these different types of lenses. Various lenses are suited for specific application. Lets have a look at some common names and what they do.
•    Normal/ Standard Lenses – These are lenses provided by the camera manufacturers along with the camera as a part of the kit. These are generally of the 18 – 55mm focal length for a normal 35mm camera.
•    Telephoto lenses – These are the lenses with focal length longer than the standard lens. Also called as Long focus Lens. These lenses are generally used to take photographs from a distance. Especially for nature and wildlife photography where you can not go near to the subject but want to fill the frame with the subject from a distance. Normally, 70 – 300mm lens is recommended for such purpose though different combination can be used based on your requirement.
•    Mirror Lenses – This is a special design of a long focus lens in which some of the lens elements are replaced with the mirrors. These lenses are generally lighter than the normal lens of the same focal length but they come with fixed aperture.
•    Wide Angle Lenses – These lenses have lower focal length than the standard lenses which helps in getting more area of view in the frame from the same distance. Typically used for landscape photography. These lenses can increase the perspective distortion. So, caution is recommended.
•    Zoom Lenses – These are the lenses with variable focal lengths. In these lenses the positive and negative elements of the lens are put together in such a way that by moving them you can get varied focal lengths. You can also find telephoto lens with zoom lens capabilities. Do not get confused between the two.
•    Macro Lenses – These lenses are designed to do close up photography like flowers, insects, etc. Basically the macro lenses have very high focusing movement than the normal lenses.
•    Aspherical & Fluorite Lenses – These lenses with special purpose. Fluorite lens uses one or more elements of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) made from synthetic crystals. This lens has a very high color correction. Aspherical lens elements help to compensate for distortion in wide-angle lenses, and compensate or eliminate spherical aberrations in lenses with a large maximum aperture. They also allow manufacturers to produce more compact lenses than was previously possible using only spherical lens elements. These are costly lenses.

Not all camera types are suitable for weather photography. An SLR 35-mm camera is most useful for starters, and - I might say - a necessity for skilled photographers. Below, I give a description of types of cameras and why they are or are not (in my eyes) suitable for weather photography.
SLR camera
For outdoor photography, and especially for weather photography, the common SLR type of camera is best suited. SLR stands for single-lens reflex, where both the composition and metering as well as the actual film exposure are being done through a single lens. When the shutter of the camera is closed, the mirror is in the path of the lens, reflecting the light upward and focusing it onto a matted glass, where you look at through the viewfinder. When you take a picture, the mirror flips upward, the shutter opens and the film is being exposed, and after the shutter closes again the mirror falls back down.

The typical 35mm SLR camera body. Most amateur and professional 35mm-photographers use such SLRs.
Some advantages of an SLR camera over other types of cameras are:
•    ruggedness - most SLR camera bodies are mechanically strong, which gives them good protection from possible accidents happening in the outdoors, and the weather environment in general. Most cameras are not water-tight or dust-proof, however; but many SLR cameras do have a fair chance to survive these conditions. This is especially true for the older, fully mechanical SLR cameras like Zenit, Pentor and Praktica.
•    adaptability - SLR cameras are used by amateurs and professionals alike, and tripods, cable releases, flash shoes and so on are widely available for these cameras.
•    modularity - choosing a separate body/lens camera system has the advantage that you can mount a wide range of lenses on a single camera body. If you plan to photograph at focal lengths between 28mm and 200mm or so, you might do well by just having a single zoomlens, but for fisheye-lenses and telescopic (very long) telephoto lenses it is always easier to have the modularity the SLR camera bodies offer.
•    single lens - you will be using a wide range of lenses, and you can easily compose the frame by looking into the viewfinder, which shows the frame like it will appear on the frame, eventually, whichever type of lens you are using.
•    picture-taking stability - SLR cameras are generally heavier and bulkier than small digital or point&shoot cameras, which makes photography by hand less prone to camera shake and blurry photos.

Select an SLR body which has an easy mount for a manual cable release (usually part of the shutter release button). A metallic body is convenient to see your camera better at night, and the camera stays cooler in daylight when the sun is shining.
There are also a few disadvantages:
•    Vibration and sound of mirror: especially when using far-telephoto lenses like 1000mm or longer, the tremor of the mirror flipping upward will shake the camera, causing the photo to be unsharp, since the shutter opens immediately after. This can be really problematic when photographing the sun’s green flash, for example, or mirages. Getting yourself a camera with mirror-lock would be better, but this does not work well either, since for green flash photography you have to keep looking through the viewfinder until just fractions of seconds before the event.
•    single-lens: while you are taking a photo on B mode (or a long exposure in general), like you would do with lightning and aurora photography, you cannot look through the viewfinder. This can sometimes be irritating, e.g. when you want to check if a thunderstorm producing lightning is still in the frame, or to see whether an airplane or car would get in the frame, possibly ruining your photo.

Submitted by Naneetha.R, II MA Communication, October, 2011

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Documentary Photography

Documentary Photography

 

 What is a Documentary Photography?

A Documentary Photography is a form of photography that is used to portray and chronicle significant and historical events. Unlike the professional photography, Documentary Photography can be amateur, artistic and or academic pursuit which is covered in photojournalism. The result of this particular type of photography is realistic, true to life and objective.

Documentary Photography is usually a candid photography of a specific subject, most often pictures of people.
Documentary Photography refers to the area of photography in which pictures are used as historical documents. Rather than serving as a source of art or aesthetic pleasure, documentary photography is often used to incite political and social change due to its ability to capture the “true” nature of an image or location. In simple terms, this school of photography uses pictures as documented evidence of a particular situation.
Lewis Hine and James Van DerZee are two of the pioneers of documentary photography. While documentary and artistic photography are considered to be at opposite ends of the spectrum, Paul Strand is one of the few photographers famous for slyly blending these two opposing schools through his avant-garde style.
Oftentimes, pictures taken in the vein of documentary photography tend to be shocking, grotesque, vivid and intense to prove a point and evoke a viewer’s emotions. Some of the most common examples of documentary photographs are featured in modern newspapers and magazines.
Through these images, the public learns truth information about cultural, political and environmental situations. Given this fact, it is no surprise that documentary photography exploded into the American consciousness during the Great Depression of 1930s when photographers were documenting the pervasive poverty.

Types Of Documentary Photography
The genre of Documentary Photography evolved at the end of the 19th century. Nowadays this term has become contrast in the contemporary professional photographic language. It’s a genre, which reveals occurrences and events, usually of the social character. It unites the aims of photographic art and photojournalism.
There are the following kinds of photo documentary:
•    Chronicles
•     Street photography
•    Typology
  and
Others, though these differentiations are rather relative and don’t have obvious borders.
•    As a rule, documentary photography is a series of shots on the concrete topic represented in the chronological order.
•    It’s also typical for this genre to be amplified with the text, describing the     subject, place and time. The text can be either minimal or detailed and usually it is the work of the photographer himself.

Aims Of Documentary Photography

: Documentary photography is now beyond simple narrative fixing of the burning issues of the day, it becomes more and more subjective. The author’s view and style are highly appreciated.
By the way, it was American chronicle photographers, who managed to show that the art can play its role in solution of social problems. In the first half of the 20th century Lewis W. Hine exposed the immorality, horrors of child labor and homelessness. Jacob Riis published the book “How The Other Half Lives”, in which he revealed the life of New-York slums. Their photos became the material evidence of social injustice and the cause of the reforms the society needed.
To show the injustice of the world and to act so that the situation would be changed. That was the aim of the photojournalists, who created an international cooperative agency “Magnum” after the World War II, in 1947 in Paris. Its founders were such acknowledged masters of documentary photography as Robert Capa, David Seymour, George Rodger and Henri Cartier-Bresson. Now it has expanded with four editorial offices in New York, London, Paris and Tokyo, and a network of fifteen sub-agents.
And it is clear because social reportage is one of the most needed genres in photo documentation. In addition, documentary photography is a unique historical and artistic evidence. Such photos are notable for their plot culmination and serious issue and leave no one being indifferent.
Documentary essay
:

“The concept of documentary photography is the shot, which aim is to describe the reality and, perhaps, to transfer some important message or story. However, the European interpretation shows documentary photography as subjective. A documentary photographer is closer to an independent author or even a poet. The main task consists in finding the way of making your ideas visible.
Relying on the words of the war photographer Robert Capa, he says: “If the shot is not good enough it means:


1) a photographer wasn’t too close to the action;


2) a photographer hasn’t read about the event enough;


3) a photographer hasn’t had a close emotional contact with the object of his photography.”
Subjective Documentary:
    •    “Come closer to the stranger.
•    Enter the new situation.
•    Discover who you are.


It is about how to find the balance between the surrounding world and your place in it. How to tell about the reality of the world through your personal truth.”
Documentary Facts As A Propaganda

“Objective documentary photography doesn’t exist. A photographer, who insists on it, is naive. Here is always a political, commercial or personal interest. The border between documentary photography and propaganda is very thin. We should learn how to reveal the strength of the propaganda photography visual language.

Shooting in different places, take one of the sides: positive or negative. And photograph the objects according to your attitude, using the instruments of propaganda.”
However, documentary photography should perform the main function - information. It should be direct and truthful to become the unique historical and artistic evidence, creating the archive of time.
More about Documentary Photography

Documentary photography is a type of professional photojournalism. But even an amateur or a film student can make a documentary photograph. Documentary photography is more about capturing the truth in the social scenario around us. It is also referred to as Candid photography as the moments captured are true and real.

Documentary photography, to a certain extent, captures the real essence of the photographers mind. They depict a certain perspective of the mind of the photographer. These photographs are usually for exhibition in an art gallery or other public forum. Sometimes an organization or company will commission documentary photography of its activities, but the pictures will only be for its private archives. The challenge for a documentary photographer is to make pictures of sensitive scenes and moments without changing them by the presence of a camera.

People should not pose for the camera or else it won’t be real! The resulting pictures - the subjects facing the camera and seen from “top to toe” are a vivid historical documentary photography archive, and have established the posed “straight up” as a valid style of documentary picture-making. 

Eugene Smith from the U.S and Henry Carier Bresson from Europe are the two most famous documentary photographers. Others, being August Sander, Eugene Atget,   Jacob Riis and the like.

In India Raghubir Singh was one of the finest documentary photographers of the twentieth century. 

Documentary photography has risen in recent times because of the rapid growth of the media. The rapid growth of documentary photography represents strong forces at work with a strong creative impulse to bring out the truth to the world. A documentary photograph says so much about the period it was taken in, the background, the prevailing conditions during that time. One has to analyze the picture carefully to gain a complete understanding of all this. These photographs serve as a record of social and political situations with the aim of conveying information.

Tips for a better Photograph:


1 Tell a story 
Use photography to tell a story. First you’ll need to choose a subject, which can be the hardest part of the process. Before you head off to far-reaching countries,  try experimenting with story and ideas closer to home. Whether it’s the drudgery of life in an office or the joy of working your own allotment, you’ll find there are plenty of interesting stories nearby.



2 Do some research 
Even if the story is close to your heart or home, you should still do some research. Plan what you want to say. Ask yourself if you want to tell the story in just one shot or whether the subject might benefit from a series of multiple pictures. A photo essay, for example, could help you to reveal more about your subject.



3 Choose your style 
Think about the way you intend to shoot and how you want the final image to look and feel. Do you want the finished pictures to be in black and white or colour? Do you only want to use natural light to enhance the mood, or will hard flash light add to your story? A bit of planning will make your photos more coherent. Take a look at the best documentary category entries of Photographer of the Year 2010 for inspiration…



4 Be prepared
Once you’ve decided on an approach and style you’ll need to ensure you have the right gear to capture your shot. You probably won’t need to take your entire kit bag with you, so just select the tools you need. Be sure you’ve got the right focal lengths covered, and ask yourself if you might need a tripod. Are your camera batteries fully charged? Have you got spare batteries for your flashgun and plenty of memory cards? Don’t let a lack of preparation ruin a shoot.



5 Get permission 
It’s a good idea to seek permission, especially if you’re photographing people going about their business. Explain what you’re doing and you’ll often get a hearty collaboration from your subject, but sneak around suspiciously and you’ll be given a wide berth or asked to leave. If you’re working on a long-term project you’ll need to build a healthy rapport to get results.



6 Don’t rush 
The best documentary pictures are often the result of a long-term project, so try not to rush in an attempt to capture all the shots in one go. If you do end up with limited time in one location, try to maximise the time you have.

  

7 Get back-up 
One of the most important tasks for a digital photographer is to ensure if all of his/her images are safe. As soon as you get back from your day’s shooting, download your images and make back-up copies on an external hard-drive or DVD. It’s a good idea to keep your back-ups in a different location to your main computer.



8 Process your images 
Once your images are safe you can start to process them. If you shoot in RAW you can make most of your tweaks to colour, tone and contrast at the processing stage using smart software such as Adobe Camera Raw. For a documentary project it’s unlikely that you’ll want to manipulate your images heavily. Just make a few adjustments or try converting to black and white for added impact.



9 Think about presentation 
once you finish your project, think about portraying it off. If you’ve made a series of images, perhaps you could have them printed and framed to be hung in an exhibition, or perhaps they would be better suited to being viewed in a book format. There are plenty of online printing services that can make great books of your pictures for a reasonable price.



10 Learn from the best photographers
Magnum Photos is a photo agency that was founded by Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger and David “Chim” Seymour just after the Second World War. It’s since become one of the world’s most important photographic institutions. Check out the ‘In Motion’ section for slideshows of the members’ work, along with fascinating commentaries.

Preethi.S, September, 2011.

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Anthology of Styles - Art Exhibition

Contemplate Art Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition organized by New Delhi’s prestigious Gallery Nature Morte showcasing the works of six emerging artists, evidence of the exciting diversity that is available to Indian artists today.

CONTEMPLATE ART GALLERY and NATURE MORTE
presents
“Anthology of Styles”
by
Archana Hande
Bassist Kumar
Dileep Sharma
Jayanta Roy
Nidhi Agarwal
Ramakrishna Behera

Exhibition: 10th March - 19th March, 2011
at
contemplate:
# 338, 1st floor, Above Rajshree Ford showroom,
Avanashi Road, Peelamedu,
Coimbatore

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WCS workshop one Report

REPORT ON THE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY - INDIA PROGRAM

WORKSHOP ON

SENSITIZING THE MEDIA ON CONSERVING TIGERS AND THEIR HABITAT IN TAMILNADU

Wildlife Conservation Society – India Program sponsored workshop on “Sensitizing the media on conserving tigers and their habitat in Tamil Nadu” was inaugurated at PSG COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE, Coimbatore on the 25th of February, 2011.

Dr.K.M. Chinnadorai, Principal in charge, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore welcomed the audience.

Dr.Raja Jayapal, Conservation Scientist, WCS - India program made a brief report on Wildlife Conservation Society-India Program project in Tamil Nadu.

Poster release on TIGER CONSERVATION followed through and was released by Mr.G.Rangaswamy, Managing Trustee, PSG Institutions and Dr.Ravi Chellam, Country Director, Wildlife Conservation Society-India program.

Mr.G.Rangaswamy addressed the audience on the need for conservation and the civil and political support conservation initiatives required.

Dr.Ravi Chellam delivered the keynote address and centered his talk on Human-wildlife relationship and conflict. The reason for conflict and mitigating measures were also discussed. He also emphasized on the lack of information based conflict management measures.

The inauguration came to a close with the vote of thanks given away by  C.R.Jayaprakash, Assistant Professor, Dept., of Communication, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore. He was also the project coordinator of the workshop.

Workshop:

The first session of the workshop commenced with a presentation of Wildlife photography versus Conservation Photography by Dr. R.Tolstoy, Associate Professor, PSG Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Coimbatore - 641 004. Dr.Tolstoy spoke of how photography could effectively help conservation and have minimal  impact on the environment it works on. He also spoke of Tribal welfare and the impact of a happy tribal population on the environment. Environmentally sensitive behavior and scientifically informed conservation photography was emphasized.

The session came to a close with a talk by Mohammad Ali, Member of The Nature Trust, Mettupalayam, on ‘Myths, Media and Wildlife reporting’. Responsible journalism and well researched reporting on wildlife issues were discussed in detail. The need to understand ones own environment, its structure and function was encouraged.  Ali’s talk set a preamble to the workshop were in participants were encouraged to discern the information gathered during the workshop and come up with a unbiased perception of wildlife and conservation.

Workshop continued at Anamalai Tiger Reserve (ATR)

The workshop at Anamalai Tiger Reserve began  with the screening of “The Truth about Tigers” by Shekar Dattatri, Wildlife Filmmaker and Conservationist, to an audience of 30, all were participants selected from 16 Colleges and Universities of Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry. The movie covered some significant aspects of Tiger conservation, the need to conserve Tigers and the issue of conservation at large.

The documentary followed with a discussion. Dr Ravi Chellam and Shekar Dattatri spear headed the discussion by bringing forth a number of conservation issues and media’s perception and projection of such issues. Responsible and informed journalism was announced to be the need of the hour.
A number of ways by which media could bring forth a well researched piece of information on marauding conservation issues were discussed. The participants raised a number of questions on issues ranging from the types of forests found in India, tiger-favored ecosystem, radio-collaring of tigers, tiger census, human-tiger conflict and human perception of conservation and tigers.
Dr.V. Manoharan, Forest Veterinary Officer, Coimbatore and Thangaraj Panneerselvam, Forest Range Officer, Ullandy, Analmalai Tiger Reserve met with the participants. Mr.Thangaraj Panneerselvam made a short presentation on Anamalai Tiger Reserve while Dr Manoharan spoke of wild-animal disease control and treatment.

Day 2: On 26th February, 2011 the participant’s begun the workshop with a trek to Karian Shola, in Anamalai Tiger Reserve. The participants spotted a few endemic birds and noted a number of bird sounds. One of the groups spotted the endemic Great Indian Hornbill and the Racket tailed drongo. Malabar giant squirrel, Indian Gaur, and Nilgiri langurs were the few mammals sighted.

A talk by Mr. Shekar Dattatri followed. Mr. Dattatri elaborated on the role of Forest department as essential guardians of forest and their inevitability in the conservation system. Human- animal conflict, conflict control, mitigation measures, and human perception of conservation were amongst the important topics discussed. The role of media in reporting such conflicts, unbiased reporting and conservation issue discussion by the media were discussed using contemporary illustrations and examples.

Dr. Chellam delivered the second lecture followed by a discussion. He argued upon the serious lack in conservation training for forest officials and for the lower grade forest watchers and anti-poaching guards. Resource provision in terms of monetary benefits and other concessions as beneficial encouragements for the lower grade forest watchers and anti-poaching guards was also emphasized. Dr Chellam spoke briefly about the WCS Initiative and its research interest.

The participants then took a tour around Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, Kerala, which lies adjacent to ATR. This was to give the participants a general idea of the topography of the reserve and of the mythical “jungle” itself. The participants witnessed the reality of managed forests and the human influence it had to cope with. The tour included a visit to the famous Kannimara teak: the Virgin tree with its own history and folk perceptions.

The day ended with the screening of Shekar Dattatri’s documentary ‘Save our Sholas’. The discussion that followed saw participants come up with some exciting and intriguing questions on shola forests and its importance in sustaining both the wild and the human world. Before the film, C.R.Jayaprakash, Project Coordinator of the workshop presented images of faulty management of forest resources and strain on forest resources which are illegally promoted in the name of Eco Tourisn.

Day 3:

The day began with a field tour into the Parambikulam Tiger Reserve. A number of birds including the Orange and black flycatcher, Male Paradise flycatcher and Malabar Pied hornbills were sighted. Mammals such as the Giant Malabar Squirrel and Indian Gaur, Spotted Deer, Sambar Deer were also sighted.

K. Vijayananthan IFS, Wildlife Warden, Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, and H.Basavaraju, IFS, Field Director, Anamalai Tiger Reserve briefed the audience on the history of Parambikulam and Anamalai Tiger Reserve. Conservation issues such as poaching, poacher-forest watcher clashes, wildlife traffic, sale nexus and wildlife laws were also discussed. The participants interacted with the officials and raised a number conservation issues including the building of check dams and its implications on the environment and the ecosystem.

Dr. Raja Jayapal, Conservation Scientist, WCS delivered the concluding talk. Research as an aspect of conservation issue reporting and the consequences of negligence of research was discussed. Unbiased issue discussion and a follow up of the issue were encouraged as an effective tool that could aid in conservation. Tiger as an efficient flag ship species for conservation and thus the need to sensitize media on the conservation of Tigers was emphasized.

The workshop ended with a feedback session headed by Dr. Ravi Chellam. The participants candidly spoke of the few aspects of the workshop that needed rethinking and readjustments while lauding many others they appreciated, such as the availability and approachability of conservation connoisseurs like Dr Chellam and Mr. Dattatri.

C.R. Jayaprakash gave away the vote of thanks thus calling the workshop to a close. He announced special prizes to the participants who take the message gathered from the workshop to the Media. Any news items in mainline dailies, Short films/Documentaries or even Posters on Tiger Conservation made by the participants would be awarded with prizes worth Rs.5,000. The cut off date for submission was announced as May 31, 2011.

Follow up:

The first entry in this category, a poster  by George Joseph Thengumootil, I MA Communication, PSG CAS was received in the first week of March, 2011. As an Early Bird entry offer, this participant stands selected to the second Workshop which is planned in the first week of May, 2o11.

Working Journalists from the Print and Electronic Media of Tamil Nadu will be invited/Selected for the second residential workshop which will be an improvement on the first camp.
Report submitted by    Martina V. Anandam.

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Titles on Photography

Movies about Photographers

Compiled by Miguel-Pereira

Films:
City of God (Fernando Meirelles, Kátia Lund).

Salvador (Oliver Stone).

Blow-up (Micheangelo Antonioni).

The killing fields (Roland Joffé).

Under fire (Roger Spottiswoode)

Pecker (John Waters).

The Year of Living Dangerously (Peter Weir).

Shooting Robert King (Richard Parry).

Born into Brothels (Ross Kauffman, Zana Briski).

Frankie’s House (Peter Fisk).

The Photographer (Jeremy Stein).

The knife (A grande Arte) (Walter Selles).

Triage (Danis Tanovic).

The public eye (Howard Franklin).

Positive (Farhan Akhtar).

Girl in a mirror (Kathy Drayton).

Palermo Shooting (Win Wenders).

Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus (Steven Shainberg).

In my father’s den (Brad McGann).

Eyes of Laura Mars (Irvin Kershner).

High Art (Lisa Cholodenko).
Documentaries:

War Photographer (James Nachtwey).
Strand, Under the Dark Cloth (John Walker).
The September issue (RJ Cutler).
The Death of Kevin Carter: Casualty of the Bang Bang Club (Dan Kraus).
The Bang Bang Club (Steven Silver).
La vida loca (Christian Poveda).
Contacts, Vol. 1: The Great Tradition of Photojournalism (Various)
Contacts, Vol. 2: The Renewal of Contemporary Photography (Various)
Contacts, Vol. 3: Conceptual Photography (Various)
American masters. Annie Leibovitz: Life through a lens.
Robert Capa: in love an war (Anne Makepeace) .
Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye (Heinz Butler).
Paisajes transformados (Jennifer Baichwal).
The genius of Photography.
La ciudad de los fotógrafos (Sebastián Moreno).
Stranger with a camera (Elizabeth Barret).
An unlikely weapon (Susan Morgan Cooper).
William Eggleston in the Real World (Michael Almereyda).
An American Journey: In Robert Frank’s Footsteps.
The Photographers Series: Debbie Fleming Caffery.
Berenice Abbott: A View of the 20th Century.
Tierney Gearon: The Mother Project.
The Decisive Moment (Henri Cartier-Bresson).
Pictures from a Revolution (Susan Meiselas).
Helmut Newton: Frames from the Edge.
Toward the Margin of Life (Cornell Capa).
The Adventure of Photography (Various).
Ralph Gibson: Photographer/ Book Artist.Aaron Siskind.
What Remains: The Life and Work of Sally Mann.
American Masters – Richard Avedon: Darkness and Light.
Masters of Photography – Diane Arbus.
Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt.
Masters of Photography – André Kertesz.
W. Eugene Smith: Photography Made Difficult.
Masters of Photography – Edward Steichen.
American Masters – Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye.
John Szarkowski: A Life in Photography.
Peter Beard: Scrapbooks From Africa & Beyond.
American Photography (Various). Half Past Autumn – The Life and Works of Gordon Parks.
National Geographic’s The Photographers (Various).
Ansel Adams – A Documentary Film.

Submitted by
Pratush Lala, Jan, 2011.

Comments

NWEA in Coimbatore Vizha 2011

Nilgiri Wildlife and Environment Association played its role of conservation again, for the second consecutive year in Coimbatore Vizha -2011.

Held at Ardra Hall in Old Huzur road, this event attracted over 50 nature lovers on Thursday ( Jan,6, 2011) evening.

Veteran Wildlife Photgrapher of Coimbatore and a life member of NWEA, T.R.Arunthavaselvan was the special guest. He presented his 40 years of Photographic works in an hours time.

Eco Club students of PSG CAS made their presence felt with a 20 member team. Media students from  S.N.S. College of Arts and Science also made it to the occasion.

Deputy Director of Tamil Nadu Forest Dept., Mr.Badrasamy, Apex Committee Member of Siruthuli, Mr. Rajesh Govindarajulu,  Young Indians office bearers Siddharth Kalingarayar, Pavithra, Sanctuary Asia award winning Photographer Prakash, Contemplate Wildlife Photo Contest award winner Karthick, Behaviour of Nesting Birds book author Sukumaran, Educationalist Sasi Kumar, Natural History Trust member Abishek.K were some of the prominent personalities amongst the learned audience.

The change in the behavioral pattern of Forest elephants remained the interesting topic for  the listeners. Pictures of Reptiles with prey also evinced high curiosity among the audience.

NWEA Executive Committee member C.R.Jayaprakash gave a brief talk on Man and Biosphere. Members Sivakumar.A, Prabhakar, Gokulakrishnan  (applicant), student member Sujith Soori.N.R, George Joseph Thengumootil ( applicant) were also present for the event.

The hall, projection facility and publicity was organised by Young Indians of Confederation of Indian Industry ( CII) on behalf of Coimbatore Vizha celebrations. After 2010, this year too NWEA got this honour of participating in the completely sponsored programme.

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